Dianella tree planting

The City of Stirling Council has set a target of 18% canopy cover across the City by 2040. Dianella’s current canopy cover sits at 11.4%.

Events will be held on Saturdays at 9.00am to 11.30am and will be followed by a free sausage sizzle for participant that have registered. 

View the tree species that will be being planting in the Dianella community tree planting event below.

Should you have any queries or concerns regarding this project click here

Weeping Peppermint

Botanical name

Agonis flexuosa

Common name

Weeping Peppermint, Peppermint Tree Willow Myrtle

Origin 

The Weeping Peppermint grows naturally in South Western Australia. Whilst a few isolated populations exist in the Perth region, the main area of distribution is from south of Mandurah through to Bremer Bay.

Characteristics

  • Evergreen
  • Tolerates a wide variety of soils including coastal limestone
  • Pollution tolerant
  • Drought tolerant
  • Long lived
  • Adapts well to power line pruning
  • Recommended by the Asthma Foundation.
Weeping Peppermint

Height and width

10m x 10m

Leaves, bark and flowers

Evergreen. Narrow pendulous leaves form a dense shaggy umbrella shape as the tree matures. The species can live to a great age and develop a characteristic thick, gnarled trunk. Flowering is variable depending on position and weather conditions for the year. Generally however the tree will develop tiny white flowers along the branches in spring.

Example location

Planted extensively throughout the City, espeically in the inland areas such as Inglewood and Mount Lawley. A good example can also be seen at the eastern end of Sorrento Street, North Beach.

Lace Bark

Botanical name

Brachychiton populneus

Common name

Lace Bark

Origin

Eastern Australia from Southern Queensland, through to North-East Victoria

Characteristics

  • Drought tolerant
  • Easy to grow
  • Tolerate a wide variety of soils
  • Provides summer shade
  • Long lived
  • Tolerant to pollution
  • Can tolerate canopy pruning.
Lace Bark

Height and width

10m x 15m

Leaves, bark and flowers

Evergreen, dark green, glossy leaves can vary from a simple leaf shape through to lobed or partly divided.  The different leaf shapes can sometimes all be found growing simultaneously on one tree. Flowering times vary depending on conditions and range from March through to early summer.  The small bell shaped flowers vary in colour from cream through to a green tint, with red, yellow, or purple coloured throats.

Example location

Semi Mature trees are located within the median along North Beach Drive in Gwelup

Tuart

Botanical name

Eucalyptus gomphocephala

Common name

Tuart

Origin 

WA native associated with underlying limestone soils, Tuart naturally occurs as open forest within South West Western Australia, roughly between Ledge Point and Busselton.

Characteristics

  • Local to City of Stirling
  • Useful for coastal limestone soils
  • Good shade tree
  • Ecolink habitat tree
  • Relatively drought tolerant
  • Fast growing
  • Not suitable under power lines.
Tuart leaves

Height and width

15m x 20m

Leaves, barks and flowers

Evergreen. Immature leaves are light green and lanceolate, maturing to falcate (sickle shaped) mid-green with a dull sheen. The brown or grey bark can be fibrous through to rough. Green flower buds that resemble ice-cream cones are followed during autumn and winter by creamy-white flowers.

Example location

Remnant trees can be found throughout coastal suburbs of the City, particularly Wembley Downs.

Pink Crepe Myrtle

Botanical name

Lagerstroemia indica ‘Tuscarora’

Common name

Pink Crepe Myrtle

Origin

China (Lagerstroemia indica), Japan (Lagerstroemia fauriei)

Characteristics

  • Deciduous
  • Feature bark
  • Attractive pink flowers in summer
  • Drought tolerant
  • Tolerates heat and high winds
  • Tolerates many soil type.
Pink Crepe Myrtle

Height

6m

Leaves, barks and flowers

Glossy dark green leaves that change to yellow, red and orange in autumn; new leaves have a bronze tint.  Bark exfoliates revealing attractive mottled trunks from cinnamon brown to pale cream tones. Produces showy candy pink flowers in summer.

Example location

Maybach Way and Victoria Avenue Dianella and on the roundabout on St Brigids Terrace, Doubleview.

Manchurian Pear

Botanical name

Pyrus ussuriensis

Common name

Manchurian Pear

Origin

China, Mongolia, Eastern Russia, Korea and Japan.

Characteristics

  • Deciduous
  • Attractive spring flowers
  • Attractive autumn foliage display
  • Hardy
  • Pollution tolerant
  • Tolerates most soil types.
Manchurian Pear

Height and width

10m by 6m

Leaves, barks and flowers

The rounded leaves turn from their summer colour of glossy dark green to tones of red, purple and gold during autumn. The colourful autumn foliage is held on the tree for a relatively long time. White flowers (slightly pink when budding) up to 3cm across smother the bare branches during spring. Considered to be the hardiest of the Pears. Pyramidal when young, the canopy develops a rounded shape as the tree matures with a relatively slow growth rate.

Almond

Botanical name

Prunus dulcis 

Common name

Almond

Origin

Middle East and West Asia

Characteristics

  • Deciduous
  • Long productive life
  • Good nectar supply for bees
  • Urban food source for native birds
  • Self-pollinating.
Almond

Height and width

10m x 5m

Leaves, barks and flowers

Deciduous pale green leaves turn yellow before falling in autumn. Bark is dark and coarse.

Example location

North eastern side of the roundabout at Broadmoor Avenue and Meadowbrook Blvd in Dianella.