​​​​In event of an emergency, the main role of the City of Stirling is to manage the recovery of the local community. Find out about the City of Stirling's emergency management committee and plans.

Overview

Western Australia suffers from both natural and man-made disasters and emergencies of various types, all of which have the potential to threaten life and property within the community. During recent years these emergencies have included storms, floods, bush fires, building fires, hazardous chemical spills, serious transport crashes (rail, road and air), suspected terrorist or similar security incidents, and missing people, aircraft and vessels.

Emergency management is a range of measures to manage risks in the community environment. It involves the structures, arrangements and plans established to pull together the efforts of government, voluntary and private agencies in a comprehensive and coordinated way to deal with the whole spectrum of emergency or disaster needs.

Western Australia's emergency management arrangements take a holistic approach to dealing with potential emergencies. This type of approach recognises that, even though specific counter-measures will often vary with different hazards or emergencies, a single set of management arrangements capable of encompassing all hazards can be established.

The City of Stirling's Local Emergency Management Arrangements describe the management protocols that control and coordinate planning and preparation for, response to, and recovery from emergencies affecting the community.

Emergency WA Warning and Incidents

Have you taken a look at the web site Emergency WA? You can access it here (https://www.emergency.wa.gov.au/prepare) The Government have created a site so you can find emergency information easier than ever before.

The site has a map-based display with the best available emergency information from across the State.

You can find information about fires, floods, storms, earthquakes, tsunamis, hazardous material incidents and traffic crashes.

Remember, we can't be everywhere at once, so you may know more about what's happening near you. Always be aware of your surroundings. If you think you might be in danger, act immediately for your own safety.

In a life threatening emergency call triple zero (000).


 

Arrangements, Plans and Information

  
  
  
  
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Heat waves

When it is very hot, you may be at increased risk of heat related illness, especially if you have medical conditions or take certain medicines. The following advice will help you to put together a plan for coping during extreme heat:

Outdoors

    • apply sunscreen​
    • wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses
    • try and stay in shaded areas as much as possible ​

Keep cool

    • rinse a cloth in cool water and use it to wipe your arms and neck
    • sleep with just a sheet over you
    • put your feet in a bowl of cool water
    • make ice cubes from water or cordial and suck them to keep cool
    • put a bowl of ice cubes in front of a fan to create a cool breeze

Indoors

    • If the house is hot and you have an air conditioner (AC), turn on the AC. Make sure it is set to 'cool' before turning it on. Visiting air conditioned local libraries or shopping centres can also offer some relief.
    • Make sure you drink plenty of fluids, even if you do not feel thirsty, unless your Doctor has advised you not to. Try to drink water or diluted fruit juice and avoid tea, coffee or alcohol.
    • Eat smaller meals more often during hot weather and try to eat more cold meals, such as salads and fruit as these also help you hydrate. Ensure that food that needs refrigeration is not left out. Using stoves or ovens less often also keeps the temperature cooler in your home.
    • If you take prescribed medicines, you must continue to take these during periods of extreme heat.
    • Some medicines can make you more prone to sunburn and heat stress, so extra care should be taken to watch for signs that you are becoming affected by the heat. If you need more advice on particular medicines, speak to your doctor or a pharmacist.
    • Wear light coloured, loose fitting clothing, preferably made from natural fibres like cotton or linen, and avoid synthetic fabrics.
    • If you use a wheelchair, walker or any other metal equipment, make sure it is kept in the shade as it can quickly become hot to touch and even cause a burn.

Heat stress

If you are elderly or disabled have a friend or family member to check on you twice a day if possible during extreme heat, especially if you live alone.

Symptoms of heat stress include:

    • headaches
    • feeling dizzy, faint or weak
    • urinating less often
    • muscle spasms or cramps
    • nausea

If you start to feel ill with symptoms of heat stress you should seek medical attention by:

    • contacting your GP
    • calling healthdirect Australia on 1800 022 222; or
    • going to the Emergency Department of your nearest hospital.

If you have more serious symptoms of heat stress, such as vomiting, becoming confused or having hot red or dry skin (because sweating has stopped), you should call 000 for an ambulance straight away. 

​​​​Hazards that may occur  within the City of Stirling 

Dangerous storms are the most common natural hazard in Australia and on average, cause more damage and destruction than cyclones, earthquakes, floods and bushfires.

Each year from May to October, storms, including, tornados, thunder, lightning, hail, flash flooding and gale force winds impact Western Australia causing major destruction to the southern half of the State, from Kalbarri to Israelite Bay. As storms are unpredictable, felt locally and happen in smaller areas their devastating impact is often underestimated.

Dangerous storms are the most common natural hazard in Australia and on average, cause more damage and destruction than cyclones, earthquakes, floods and bushfires.

Each year from May to October, storms, including, tornados, thunder, lightning, hail, flash flooding and gale force winds impact Western Australia causing major destruction to the southern half of the State, from Kalbarri to Israelite Bay. As storms are unpredictable, felt locally and happen in smaller areas their devastating impact is often underestimated.

Storms

Storms not only cause damage to homes, property and businesses, they also pose a threat to people, animals and the environment.

The financial and community cost can be lessened with better planning and by preparing your home and family to stay safe and reduce the damage.

To keep informed about the latest weather information visit www.bom.gov.au or call 1300 659 213.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services have further information about dealing with storms at their website which can be found here.

Fire
Each year thousands of fires destroy or damage houses, sheds and garages, commercial and industrial buildings, vehicles and vast hectares of bushland throughout Western Australia.

Bushfires in WA account for the highest number of fires attended to by career and volunteer fire-fighters. Career and volunteer fire-fighters responded to and put out 1,550 structural fires, 1,850 rubbish fires, 1,350 vehicle and caravan fires and 7,050 bushfires from January to December 2010.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) Fire Investigation and Analysis Unit also support operational fire crews to establish the origin and cause of all fires attended by DFES. The unit also work closely with the Police Arson Squad to identify the cause of all suspicious and deliberately lit fires.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services have further information about dealing with fire at their website which can be found here.

Flood
Australia has a history of floods, causing devastating human and economic impact.

Floods are a natural process influenced largely by the weather and driven by the amount of rainfall and length of time it falls. After heavy rainfall, rivers, creeks and catchments may overflow this type of flooding is most common in Australia and is known as riverine flooding.

Western Australia is the largest state in Australia with a vast range of climatic conditions and seasonal changes that influence and increase the potential for flooding.

If you live in a flood prone region, then you need to prepare for the possibility of a flood endangering you, your family and impacting your property, even isolating you from the community and essential services.

Some household insurances policies do not provide flood cover so you also need to be prepared emotionally and financially. Start to weigh up the possibility of flooding where you live and prepare your family and home to minimise the risk and ensure their safety.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services have further information about dealing with floods at their website which can be found here.

Total Fire Bans

Information regarding current Total Fire Bans can be found here.

Frequent QuestionExplanation
What is a Total Fire Ban

A Total Fire Ban (TFB) is declared by the Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) because of extreme weather conditions or when widespread fires are seriously stretching fire fighting resources. A TFB is declared by DFES following consultation with local governments.

When a TFB is declared it prohibits the lighting of any fires in the open air and any other activities that may start a fire.

The ban includes all open air fires for the purpose of cooking or camping. It also includes incinerators, welding, grinding, soldering or gas cutting.

Exemptions may be allowed for some industries and activities with conditions applied.

When is a TFB declared

A Total Fire Ban (TFB) is declared on days when fires are most likely to threaten lives and property. This is because of predicted adverse fire weather or when widespread fires are impacting the availability of resources.

The declaration of a ban considers local factors such as the forecast weather, available resources, the number of days since last rain and the amount of vegetation in the area that could burn during a fire.

In consultation with the Bureau of Meteorology and local governments the need for the ban is assessed and may be revoked during the day if the forecast weather does not eventuate or if weather conditions ease.

Exemptions

Some industries and activities may be given an exemption depending on the nature of their activity.

Obtaining an exemption

An exemption may be granted if the applicant can show they are taking proper steps to prevent any fire spreading, and can control and put out any fire that may start.

Exemptions can cover specific times and locations and can be changed or cancelled at any time.

DFES recommends that applicants apply for an exemption prior to the bushfire season.

Applicants need to apply for an exemption by completing an exemption application form.

Click here for the exemption application form

Click here for a guide to completing the form and where to send it

How is a TFB publicised

When a Total Fire Ban has been declared it will be:

· Featured on the Total Fire Bans page of the DFES website

· Published on DFES's Twitter account

· Published to subscribers through the DFES website's automated RSS feeds

· Broadcast on ABC local radio and other media outlets

· On the Total Fire Ban information line: 1800 709 355

· Displayed on Main Roads WA Variable Message Signs, where possible

· Displayed on local government roadside Fire Danger Rating (FDR) signs

How long is a Total Fire Ban in place?

When declared, Total Fire Bans are in place for the whole day, from midnight to midnight.

They may be revoked during the day if the forecast weather does not eventuate or if weather conditions ease.

Harvest and Vehicle Movement Bans

Harvest and Vehicle Movement Bans are issued by local governments.

It is your responsibility as a harvester operator to be aware of any bans in place before harvesting as you could be fined for breaching a ban.

A Harvest and Vehicle Movement Ban is a ban that individual local governments are responsible for issuing under the Bush Fires Regulations 1954 Section 38A, and/or Section 24C.

Local government will impose the ban when their Bushfire Control Officer is of the opinion that the use of engines, vehicles, plant or machinery during the prohibited burning times or the restricted burning times or both is likely to cause a fire or contribute to the spread of a bushfire

These prohibited and restricted burning times vary between the individual local governments but as a guide generally extend over the traditional summer period from October through to April.

A Harvest and Vehicle Movement Ban may be imposed for any length of time but is generally imposed for the 'heat of the day' periods and may be extended or revoked by the local government should weather conditions change.

The responsibility remains on the individual to ensure that any activity undertaken is not likely to start a fire and that a Harvest and Vehicle Movement Ban is currently not in place in their local government area.

To find out if a Harvest and Vehicle Movement Ban has been imposed you need to contact your local government and ask for their Bushfire Control Officer or Ranger Services.

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) may be released by accident or by a deliberate criminal act. Exposure to some hazardous materials could cause serious injury or be fatal.

Every year Fire and Rescue Service (FRS) officers attend and control a range of HAZMAT incidents. These can involve explosives, compressed gases, flammable liquids and gases, poisons, corrosive substances, radioactive materials and infectious materials.

Containing uncontrolled hazardous materials is a complex and challenging task requiring a range of different response methods to ensure community safety and protect the environment.

Licensees of premises storing HAZMAT materials need to plan ahead to manage potential incidents involving dangerous goods.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services have further information about dealing with hazardous materials at their website which can be found here.

Emergency Alert

WA has moved to EMERGENCY ALERT.

Western Australia has moved to a national system that will better deliver messages directly to your mobile or landline telephone during emergencies.Emergency Alert

There is no need to register or sign up to Emergency Alert.
In the case of an emergency, you may receive a voice message on your landline telephone based on the location of the handset or a text message on your mobile phone, based on the service address of the phone.

Emergency Alert is a free phone messaging service that sends voice and text warnings to your phone during an emergency when lives may be in danger in your neighbourhood or where you are located.

Since November 30 2012, Emergency Alert has replaced StateAlert as the system used by WA authorities, such as the Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) and WA Police, to send you messages during emergencies including fire, cyclone, chemical spills and tsunami.

While the new system uses state of the art technology, you will not receive an Emergency Alert in all circumstances. You need to be aware of your surroundings and actively look for information from different sources during an emergency. If your safety is threatened, then take immediate action to protect yourself and your family, even without a warning.

How you receive emergency messages through Emergency Alert will be similar to StateAlert, but the new system offers greater flexibility and improvement. For example:

    • Emergency Alert has the capacity and capability to send more messages to more people.
    • Households and mobile phones closer to the threat can be made the priority and targeted first with Emergency Alerts.
    • People who are travelling through an area under threat may be sent text messages on their mobile phones using Emergency Alert's world first location based technology.
    • Under the Emergency Alert system, messages advising of imminent threats are sent to landline telephones based on the location of the handset, and to mobile phones, based on the service address or current location.

Under the Emergency Alert system, messages advising of imminent threats are sent to landline telephones based on the location of the handset, and to mobile phones, based on the service address or current location.

In the case of an emergency, you may receive a voice message on your landline or a text message on your mobile phone. If you receive an Emergency Alert and want more information, follow the instructions in the message or visit the DFES website. For more information on Emergency Alert www.emer​​gencyalert.gov.au.

City of Stirling's role in emergency management

The Emergency Management Act 2005 outlines the roles, responsibilities and organisational structures required to manage emergencies. One of the main roles identified for local government is to manage the recovery of the local community following an emergency or disaster. Recovery involves getting the community back to normal physically, socially and economically as soon as possible after an emergency. The City has a Local Emergency Management Committee, a local Emergency Management Coordinator and Local Emergency Management Arrangements in place to help with this process.

For more information or advice, please contact the City of Stirling Emergency Management Coordinator at emergencymanagement@stirling.wa.gov.au.

Local Emergency Management Committee

The City of Stirling Local Emergency Management Committee (LEMC) has been established by the City to:

  • Advise and assist the City in ensuring that local emergency management arrangements are established
  • Liaise with public authorities and others in the development, review and testing of local emergency management arrangements
  • Carry out other emergency management arrangement activities as directed by the State Emergency Management Committee or regulation.

Note: The LEMC is an emergency planning body, and although it will often incorporate members from operational agencies, its role is not operational or one of response.

Members of the City of Stirling LEMC include City of Stirling Councillors and staff, as well as representatives from the Fire and Emergency Services Authority WA, St John Ambulance, WA Police, WA Department of Health, the Stirling State Emergency Service Unit and the Department of Child Protection and Family Support. The LEMC also facilitates emergency management training and exercises

Local Emergency Management Committee​

  
  
  
  
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