Learn more about the history, residential and community development, and significant landmarks of the City of Stirling’s 30 suburbs.

Balcatta

Balcatta, meaning ‘his hill’, was predominantly used for market gardening until the 60s and 70s, when industries moved into the area and blue-collar workers began to establish homes. Find out more about Balcatta, including residential, commercial and community development.
 

Balga

Balga, from the Aboriginal word for an indigenous tree, was originally used for market gardens and poultry farms, before large-scale development of Balga began in the late 1950s. Find out more about Balga, including residential, commercial and community development.
 

Carine

Carine, named after two swamps in the area, was largely undeveloped until the 1960s, but is now considered the heart of suburbia, with a large proportion of double-storied houses to take advantage of ocean views. Find out more
about Carine, including residential and community development.
 

Churchlands

Churchlands received its name after the land was sold to Catholic Bishop Matthew Gibney, and little development occurred in Churchlands until extensive subdivisions took place the 1980s. Find out more about Churchlands, including residential and community development.
 

Coolbinia

Coolbinia, the Aboriginal word for mistletoe, was part of Mount Lawley until 1953. It was designed for green streets with low-density dwellings, reflecting different eras of residential development. Find out more about Coolbinia, including residential and community development.
 

Dianella

Dianella is named after a small blue lily that used to be common in the area. Sandy soil hampered growth until the 1960s when housing construction first occurring north from Walter Road and Grand Promenade. Find out more about Dianella, including residential and community development.
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Doubleview

Doubleview was named for its views of both the Indian Ocean and the Darling Ranges, but development was slow until returning World War Two soldiers were given homes in the area. Find out more about Doubleview, including residential and community development.
 

Glendalough

Glendalough literally means “valley of the lakes”, as it is located between Lake Monger and Herdsman Lake. The majority of housing is brick and tile with timber floors. Find out more about Glendalough, including residential and community development.
 

Gwelup

The name Gwelup comes from an Aboriginal word meaning “to shift position”, referring to the lake. It was used mainly for market gardens until the 1970s, when it was transformed into a residential suburb. Find out more about Gwelup, including residential and community development.
 

Hamersley

Hamersley is named after the family that settled there in 1837. Development occurred in 2 stages during the 70s and 80s, and it was the first suburb using a cul-de-sac design. Find out more about Hamersley, including residential and community development.
 

Inglewood

Possibly named after a Norwegian ship, the suburb of Inglewood has a high heritage value, with numerous places of cultural and historical significance. Find out more about Inglewood, including residential and community development.
 

Innaloo

In 1927, the area named Njookenbooroo was changed to Innaloo at the request of the local progress association, where duplex homes and units are side-by-side the post-war timber-frame character homes. Find out more about Innaloo, including residential and community development.
 

Joondanna

Originally named “Joondanna Heights”, subdivision of the suburb of Joondanna saw rapid development in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and by 1958 little vacant land was available. Find out more about Joondanna, including residential and community development.
 

Karrinyup

Karrinyup is derived from an Aboriginal word meaning 'the place where bush kangaroos graze'. Rapid growth began in 1957 and most of the houses are relatively modern. Find out more about Karrinyup, including residential and community development.
 

Menora

Menora, which means a 7-branched Jewish candelabra, has a strong association with the Jewish community. It was designed on the principles of the garden suburb and has a varied residential character. Find out more about Menora, including residential and community development.
 

Mirrabooka

Mirrabooka, which is the Aboriginal name for the Southern Cross, was originally planned as a satellite city, but this was revised into a suburb instead. Find out more about Mirrabooka, including residential and community development.
 

Mount Lawley

Mount Lawley was named in honour of former Governor of Western Australia Sir Arthur Lawley, and became renowned for the Pineapple Inn, a stopping place for travellers in the 1830s. Find out more about Mount Lawley, including residential and community development.
 

Nollamara

Nollamara is named after the Aboriginal word for the black kangaroo paw plant, and was developed in 1950 as part of the Mirrabooka satellite city project. Find out more about Nollamara, including residential and community development.
 

North Beach

North Beach was the former location of the famous Castle Hotel. It has a diverse range of housing types including old holiday dwellings, former workers’ houses, modern dwellings and character houses. Find out more about North Beach, including residential and community development.
 

Osborne Park

Osborne Park was named after William Osborne, a butcher and elected member of the Perth Road Board. It contains the City of Stirling’s largest employer, West Australian Newspapers. Find out more about Osborne Park, including residential and community development.
 

Scarborough

Named after the English beach resort, Scarborough was once dominated by holiday homes and single detached houses. Find out more about Scarborough, including residential and community development.
 

Stirling

Stirling was named after Admiral Sir James Stirling, the first Governor of Western Australia, and contains the City of Stirling offices, Osborne Park Hospital and the Stirling train station. Find out more about Stirling, including residential and community development.
 

Trigg

Trigg was named after Henry Trigg, former Superintendent of Public Works for the Swan River Colony. In 1919 there were only 3 buildings in the locality, and holiday and fishing shacks begin to appear in the 1920s. Find out more about Trigg, including residential and community development.
 

Tuart Hill

Tuart Hill was named after the type of eucalyptus trees in the area and contains a rich diversity of housing types and styles. Find out more about Tuart Hill, including residential and community development.
 

Watermans Bay

Watermans Bay, originally Waterman Bay, was named after Alfred Waterman, who built the first house in the area. Find out more about Watermans Bay, including residential and community development.
 

Wembley

In April 1925 the City of Perth suggested that the area should be called "Wembley Park" after the Greater London suburb where the Empire Exhibition of 1924 was held.  The name Wembley was approved and gazetted on July 2 1924.

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Wembley Downs

The name "Wembley Downs" is actually derived from the name of the local golf course was named after a town in England. Find out more about Wembley Downs, including residential and community development.
 

Westminster

The suburb of Westminster came about when residents requested the City of Stirling to rename the southern portion of Balga after the name of the original estate. Find out more about Westminster, including residential and community development.
 

Woodlands

Woodlands names after the original estate that was on the land, and development only began in the 1960s is still growing. Find out more about Woodlands, including residential and community development.
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Yokine

‘Yokine’ is derived from the Aboriginal word meaning 'native dog', as the area is close to Dog Swamp. Find out more about Yokine, including residential and community development.